Exceptionless Documentation has Moved & Grown

Exceptionless-documentation-githubThe Exceptionless documentation has moved to GitHub!

Over the past few weeks, we have taken all the existing documentation on the docs subdomain and migrated it over to the respective GitHub repo.

We also pulled out worthy examples, demos, and tutorials from past blog posts and created pages for those, so information is in a more centralized area that is hopefully easier for our users to locate and utilize.

As new features, demos, examples, and clients come online, expect to see them added to the new documentation system and updated regularly.

Exceptionless Documentation Tour #

Primary Documentation (hub) #

github-primary-docs

This documentation contains all the documentation and details/usage for the platform's features and dashboard/ui. That includes information on project settings, security, API usage, filtering & searching, email notifications, bulk actions, frequently asked questions, how to contribute to the project, and the basic requirements to run the platform.

And, of course, you can get to the documentation for the individual clients (below) from this primary site as well.

Basically, you can always start here and branch out to whatever client or feature you're looking for documentation for.

Check it out!

.NET Client Documentation #

github-dotnet

As you may have guessed, this documentation site resides within the Exceptionless.NET repo and contains .NET-specific info, examples, demos, and tutorials for different features. If you're a .NET user, this should be where you look for examples if you're just getting started or solutions to troubleshooting problems if you've run into a snag.

View the .NET Docs

JavaScript / Node.js Client Documentation #

github-javascript

The newest addition to Exceptionless, our JavaScript / Node.js client, needs a place for documentation too! Naturally, that place is within the Exceptionless.JavaScript repo! Here you'll find JavaScript-specific details, examples, and tutorials for things like configuring the client, sending events, self hosting, RequireJS, SystemJS, TypeScript, Express, and client configuration values.

We really hope this helps users familiarize themselves with the JavaScript client and get the most benefit out of it. We know its flexibility will help a ton of developers get their apps in order.

View the JavaScript Docs

You Can Contribute, Too! #

Do you know something that could use a better example, description, or tutorial? Have you put together something that would add value for other Exceptionless users if added to the documentation? Shoot any thoughts, examples, feedback, or requests our way and we'll make sure it gets handled properly.

Exceptionless Case Study - Scientific Lab Equipment

blog-header-image-small-case-studyIt's always great to hear back from our users, whether it's a simple "atta boy" or a full page's worth of feedback.

Today we thought it would be nice to share a recent case study from one of our users that lives in the scientific laboratory and processing equipment space. Their company is a leading provider of stirring, mixing, and kneading machines, among other things, that are used by the pharmaceutical, chemical, food, paint, cosmetic, and plastics industries around the world. Neat!

"It helps me zero in on what could be the issue, AND have a documented track of what all errors I’ve seen."

The Questions #

When a user hits a certain number of sessions with Exceptionless, we shoot them a quick survey email asking them a few things that might help us improve our product and get a better feel for how our users are utilizing it's features.

In a nutshell, we ask the following:

  1. What's the number one customer-facing bug Exceptionless helped you squash?
  2. Were you surprised at the initial results of using Exceptionless for the first time? How many errors were you seeing?
  3. What is the number one internal bug you were able to track down with Exceptionless?
  4. If you had one feature you'd like us to add to Exceptionless, what would it be?
  5. What other examples or feedback do you have?

Answer Time! #

"I’d say that Exceptionless helps me find all the bugs which I’d have to spend more time on zeroing in on, faster."

The user was gracious enough to provide us with the following answers to the above general questions.

  1. "Well, since our application is not yet released to the customer, I’m using Exceptionless to report bugs/crashes which I encounter routinely while testing the UI. It helps me zero in on what could be the issue, AND have a documented track of what all errors I’ve seen."
  2. "Since Exceptionless is being used by me DURING development, it’s not surprising at all! 🙂 Maybe 4-5 bugs per day in sporadic bouts of crashes. Sometimes no bugs for a long time!"
  3. "More than ONE major bug, I’d say that Exceptionless helps me find all the bugs which I’d have to spend more time on zeroing in on, faster."
  4. "Support for snapshots (user reviewed), memory dump files is my number ONE feature request."
  5. "Will update you on this once I release to customers. But it’s nice having the confidence that Exceptionless will help me squash bugs AS they get reported, instead of having to wait for that brave customer who girdles up his loins and takes up the onerous task of finding out how to report bugs and whom to report them to! Most customers would have just cursed me and gone ahead with workarounds! :)"

How About You? Got Any Feedback? #

Consider this for a second: If every user provided 10 minutes of feedback on the products they use and love, the owners of those products/programs/tools/experiences would be able to improve them much faster and with drastically more focus and drive.

With that said... give us 5, 10, or maybe 15 minutes and answer the above questions for us in the comments below. We're no Microsoft - your voice will be heard, and any suggestions will be strongly considered/debated. Who knows - maybe we work on your feature request next!

Exclude and Protect Sensitive Data within Exceptionless

Exceptionless Data Exclusions for SecurityWe realize you may have sensitive data that could potentially be transmitted within an Exceptionless error, event, log message, etc.

In order to help make sure that information is not compromised, we have included a simple comma delimited field for data exclusions on the Exceptionless Project Settings page where you can add field names that you would like to be excluded from any error or event that is reported.

Once set, the excluded field data is discarded at the client level and never hits our servers.

Types of Data You Can Exclude #

You can exclude data from any of the following:

  • Extended Data Properties
  • Form Fields
  • Cookies
  • Query Parameters

Data Exclusion Wildcards #

To be extra careful with your data, using * allows you to specify wildcards that can be used to dictate "starts with," "ends with," or "contains."

  • string*
    Following the string with a wildcard removes any field that starts with the string from the event report.
  • *string
    If you prefix the field name with a wildcard, it will remove any field that ends with the string.
  • *string*
    Using a wildcard before and after the string means that the system will remove any field that contains the string.

Example #

Exceptionless Security

One potential example is, let’s say, user addresses. Perhaps you have multiple user addresses that may get transmitted, and you want to exclude some or all of them. Maybe you have "HomeAddress" and "WorkAddress".

To exclude only "HomeAddress" data, you would just add HomeAddress as an exclusion. The same goes for "WorkAddress."

To exclude both, you could either add HomeAddress and WorkAddress, separated by a comma, or you could use *Address if those were the only two fields that ended with "Address." If those were the only fields that contained "Address" at all, you could use *Address*.

It's easy stuff, but powerful enough to be aware of and use where possible to ensure security.

What Do You Exclude? #

We are sure you can come up with some creative exclusions for various types of sensitive data. At Exceptionless, we exclude any and all relatively sensitive data to protect our users as much as possible.

Obviously, things like passwords, credit card info, etc are encrypted, but other fields such as addresses, etc, are also relatively sensitive information that typically doesn’t need to be displayed.

What do you exclude? Do you have any feedback about this Exceptionless feature? Let us know!

The Power of Real-time Project Settings

Did you know there are customizable server/client configuration values within your Exceptionless Project's settings? Well now you do - and knowing is half the battle!

These project level settings are a dictionary of key value pairs (string key, string value). They are defined server-side and automatically pushed to the client when they are updated. Using this feature allows you to control what you send without redeploying your app, which we think is pretty cool!

You can use these client configuration settings for a variety of applications, including:

  • Controlling data exclusions for protecting sensitive information
  • Enabling / Disabling user signups
  • Turning logging on or off
  • Enabling analytics
  • Controlling information collection
  • And many more! You can send any key value pair to control whatever you like within your app.

Let's take a look at a JavaScript and .NET client usage example to get your rolling with this feature.

Adding a New Client Configuration Value #

Exceptionless Client Configuration Settings

Before we get started with more of an explanation and an example, we need to add a new key and value. To do so, we go to Admin > Projects in our Exceptionless Dashboard, select the project we are working on, then go to the "Settings" tab.

This is where we can add a "New Client Configuration," which simply consists of the key and value. For the example below, we'll add the (fictional) enableLogSubmission key and set it to true.

How it Works #

When your application first starts up, your project's client configuration settings are read (from storage) and applied.

If a setting value doesn’t exist in storage, it will be retrieved from the server after the next event submission occurs. We do this by inspecting the response headers and comparing a response header that contains the setting version. If the version doesn’t match the saved setting value then we make a request to get the setting and apply it.

It’s worth noting that we allow you to define your own default settings and overwrite them with server side settings, which we'll include in our example.

How do I use the client configuration settings? #

In the example below, we will dynamically turn on or off the log event submissions at runtime without restarting the app or logging into the server to change configuration settings.

Why, you ask? Maybe we don't care about log submission until there is a really tough issue to solve. With Client Configuration Values, we can simply turn it on only when needed.

We’ll assume for this example that we are using the enableLogSubmission key we created above to control this. This setting is made up and doesn’t have to exist server side since we will be providing a default value client side. This allows us to define it via the project settings page at anytime and change our applications behavior.

To control this we will be registering a new client side plugin that runs every time an event is created. If our key (enableLogSubmission) is set to false and the event type is set to log, we will discard the event.

.NET Example #

ExceptionlessClient.Default.Configuration.AddPlugin("Conditionally cancel log submission", 100, context => {
var enableLogSubmission = context.Client.Configuration.Settings.GetBoolean("enableLogSubmission", true);

// only cancel event submission if it’s a log event and enableLogSubmission is false
if (context.Event.Type == Event.KnownTypes.Log && !enableLogSubmission) {
context.Cancel = true;
}
});

You might notice that we are calling the GetBoolean method to check the enableLogSubmission key. This is a helper method that makes it easy to consume saved client configuration values. The first parameter defines the settings key (name). The second parameter is optional and allows you to set a default value if the key doesn’t exist in the settings or was unable to be converted to the proper type (e.g., a boolean).

.NET Helpers

Above, we used the GetBoolean helper method. In the .NET client, we have a few helpers to convert string configuration values to different system types. These methods also contain overloads that allow you to specify default values.

Helper List

  • GetString
  • GetBoolean
  • GetInt32
  • GetInt64
  • GetDouble
  • GetDateTime
  • GetDateTimeOffset
  • GetGuid
  • GetStringCollection (breaks a comma delimited list into an IEnumerable of strings)

JavaScript Example #

The same functionality above can also be achieved using our new JavaScript Client.

exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient.default.config.addPlugin('Conditionally cancel log submission', 100, function (context, next) {
var enableLogSubmission = context.client.config.settings['enableLogSubmission'];

// only cancel event submission if it’s a log event and
// enableLogSubmission is set to a value and the value is not true.
if (context.event.type === 'log' && (!!enableLogSubmission && enableLogSubmission !== 'true')) {
context.cancelled = true;
}

next();
});

Subscribing to Setting Changes #

If you would like to be notified when client configuration settings are changed, you can subscribe to them using something like the below code. This is useful when you want to update your application in real time when settings change server side.

.NET #

ExceptionlessClient.Default.Configuration.Settings.Changed += SettingsOnChanged;

private void SettingsOnChanged(object sender, ChangedEventArgs<KeyValuePair<string, string>> args) {
Console.WriteLine("The key {0} was {1}", args.Item.Key, args.Action);
}

JavaScript #

exceptionless.SettingsManager.onChanged(function(configuration)  {
// configuration.settings contains the new settings
});

Any Questions? #

These Client Configuration Values are somewhat of a hidden Exceptionless gem, but we think they are power and that many of our users can find real value in using them to control the flow of information, specifically sensitive data.

If you have any questions or comments, please let us know. As usual, we're all ears!

JavaScript / Node.js Client V1 Release Notes

Exceptionless LogoLast week we announced the V1 release candidate for the Exceptionless JavaScript/Node.js Client. This week we've got official release notes for you! Have a look.

Release Notes #

  • Client supports JavaScript and Node (Works everywhere)
  • Send your errors, logs or feature usages to your Exceptionless dashboard
  • Supports various module formats such as es6 (SystemJS/jspm), UMDRequireJS, CommonJS, or global
  • We built the Exceptionless JavaScript/Nodes.js Client with the past and future browsers in mind. Everything is testable via components injected on startup (via dependency injection), which means you can replace any component of the system to fit your specific needs.
  • Client is a full feature parity of our .NET clients, including:
    • Support for custom objects
    • Mark events as critical
    • Server side settings
    • Data exclusions
    • Plugins
    • and more...
  • Includes first class integration for third party libraries like AngularJS and Express

Usage, Examples, and more... #

Everything you need to get up and running (including contributing/developing) can be found on the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub repo. JavaScript, Express, TypeScript, SystemJS, and RequireJS examples can be found in the example folder. As always, you can contact us via an in-app message for help, or submit an issue on GitHub with bugs, feedback, etc. We're here to make sure you get things working properly so you can take full advantage of Exceptionless!

JavaScript & Node.js Client Version 1 Release Candidate

Exceptionless JavaScript Client

If you've been following along the last few weeks, you know we've been working hard to get the new JavaScript Client up to speed and ready for a version 1 release.

We think we're there!

Whether you're a JavaScript or Node.js user, you'll be able to enjoy the same full featured exception and event reporting platform that our primary .NET client offers, with fewer platform specific boundaries.

Sure It's Ready? #

We have been doing extensive testing over the course of the last month, which has allowed us to identify issues and inefficiencies throughout. Each of those has been addressed with several improvements and fixes, leaving us with a much faster, more stable client.

Many of the tweaks we made were related to IE9 and Node. Those issues have been resolved and things are working well now. In addition, we further increased performance by shrinking the library size fairly drastically.

Moving forward, we will just be working on bug fixes related to user-reported issues as usage picks up.

Recent Bug Fixes, Issue Resolutions, & Improvements #

  • Ensured compatibility with module formats like es6 (SystemJS/jspm) and RequireJS
  • Various IE9 and Node compatibility issues fixed
  • Decreased library size to improve performance and efficiency
  • Various other performance improvements
  • Fixed Angular integration failures with Angular Router
  • Fixed - Unable to integrate with Aurelia due to node being improperly detected
  • Changed the implementation of the InMemoryStorage to do a get instead of a get and delete
  • Unable to post events with the NodeSubmissionClient over http fixed
  • Fixed - Unit tests are failing due to transpilation

Start Using It! #

We've already released a few blog posts (linked below) that detail how to get up and running, but please visit the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub Repo for the most up-to-date documentation.

JavaScript Users can find installation, configuration, usage details and examples here.

If you're a Node.js user, follow this article to get set up and running.

We've also got examples/samples on GitHub for JavaScript, Express, TypeScript, SystemJS, and RequireJS.

Let Us Know What You Think #

We're suckers for feedback, so let us have it whether good, bad, or indifferent. Bugs, etc should be reported on the GitHub Issues page, but feel free to shoot us an in-app message, email, etc and let us know what you think and if you had any issues getting everything working.

JavaScript Client Demo - Exceptionless

Exceptionless JavaScript Client

We're getting closer and closer to version 1.0 of our JavaScript client, and we wanted to give everyone a demo of installation, configuration, and usage.

If you're using Node.js, make sure to check out last week's blog post for Node specific examples. Otherwise, continue reading for JavaScript examples.

As you read and begin playing with the Exceptionless JavaScript client, please make note of any feedback, bugs, etc, and submit a GitHub issue so we can fast track version 1.0 - we surely appreciate it!

How the JavaScript Client was Built #

We built our JavaScript client in typescript 1.5 transpiled it to es5. Our single client works with both Node.js and JavaScript due to dependency injection and a Universal Module Definition (UMD).

Installing the Exceptionless JavaScript Client #

Via Bower #

  1. Install the package by running bower install exceptionless
  2. Add the Exceptionless script to your HTML page. We recommend placing the script at the top of the document to ensure Exceptionless picks up and reports the absolute most potential exceptions and events.
<script src="bower_components/exceptionless/dist/exceptionless.min.js"></script>

Configuring the Client #

Configuration of the Exceptionless JavaScript client can be accomplished a variety of ways. We list the common ways below, but make sure to check the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub repo for the most up to date documentation if you run into any problems using this example code.
NOTE: The only required setting you need to configure is the client's apiKey.

Configuration Options #

1. Configure the apiKey as part of the script tag. This method will be applied to all new instances of the ExceptionlessClient

<script src="bower_components/exceptionless/dist/exceptionless.min.js?apiKey=API_KEY_HERE"></script>

2. Set the apiKey on the default ExceptionlessClient instance.

var client = exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient.default;
client.config.apiKey = 'API_KEY_HERE';

3. Create a new instance of the ExceptionlessClient and specify the apiKey or configuration object. Note that the configuration object is optional.

var client = new exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient('API_KEY_HERE'); // Required

// or with a configuration object
//var client = new exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient({
//apiKey: 'API_KEY_HERE',
//submissionBatchSize: 100
//});

Sending Events #

Unhandled exceptions will automatically be sent to your Exceptionless dashboard once the JavaScript client is configured properly. In order to send additional events, including log messages, feature usages, and more, you can use the code samples below and check the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub Repo for the latest examples and documentation.

Sending Log Messages, Feature Usages, etc #

var client = exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient.default;

client.submitLog('Logging made easy');

// You can also specify the log source and log level.
// We recommend specifying one of the following log levels: Trace, Debug, Info, Warn, Error
client.submitLog('app.logger', 'This is so easy', 'Info');
client.createLog('app.logger', 'This is so easy', 'Info').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit feature usages
client.submitFeatureUsage('MyFeature');
client.createFeatureUsage('MyFeature').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit a 404
client.submitNotFound('/somepage');
client.createNotFound('/somepage').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit a custom event type
client.submitEvent({ message = 'Low Fuel', type = 'racecar', source = 'Fuel System' });

Manually Sending Errors #

To manually send events other than the automatically reported unhandled exceptions, you can use our fluent event builder API.

The below example demonstrates sending a new error, "test," and setting the ReferenceID, Order and Quote properties, Tags, Geo, UserIdentity, and marking it as Critical.

var client = exceptionless.ExceptionlessClient.default;

try {
throw new Error('test');
} catch (error) {
client.createException(error)
// Set the reference id of the event so we can search for it later (reference:id).
// This will automatically be populated if you call client.config.useReferenceIds();
.setReferenceId('random guid')
// Add the order object (the ability to exclude specific fields will be coming in a future version).
.setProperty("Order", order)
// Set the quote number.
.setProperty("Quote", 123)
// Add an order tag.
.addTags("Order")
// Mark critical.
.markAsCritical()
// Set the coordinates of the end user.
.setGeo(43.595089, -88.444602)
// Set the user id that is in our system and provide a friendly name.
.setUserIdentity(user.Id, user.FullName)
// Submit the event.
.submit();
}

What Data is Collected? #

We built the JavaScript client to be full featured and allow you to report and log all the data our other clients do. It has a fluent API, as mentioned above, and is ready to rock and roll.

We wire up to the window.onerror handler by default, in order to send unhandled exceptions to your Exceptionless dashboard automatically.

Finishing off the Exceptionless JavaScript client features, every event also includes request information.

A few screenshots of an individual event can be found below.

Exceptionless JavaScript Event Request Details

Request Details

Sample

We have put together an example that you can use to get an idea of how everything works. It is available on the GitHub Repo.

To Get the Example Running... #

  1. Clone or download the GitHub Repo
  2. Edit the HTML file in the root example folder and replace the existing API Key with yours. Also, comment out the serverUrl.
  3. Open the HTML file in your browser
  4. Open the console so that you can see the debug messages that the example generates
  5. Click the buttons on the page to submit an event

Troubleshooting

Calling client.config.useDebugLogger(); to enable debug logging is recommend and will output messages to the console regarding what the client is doing. Please contact us by creating an issue on GitHub if you need help or have any feedback regarding the JavaScript client.

Feedback #

As we move forward towards version 1.0 of our JavaScript client, we are looking for any and all feedback, so please don't hesitate to let us know what you think, report a bug, etc.

Happy coding!

Exceptionless Node.js JavaScript Client Demo

Exceptionless Node.js JavaScript Client

Last week we announced our full featured JavaScript client, and we're super excited about releasing a version 1.0 soon.

This week we'd like to put more details out there on the Node.js version of the JavaScript client, including installation, configuration, and usage. We've also set up an Express.js sample app that you can spin up locally to play with things.

Let's take a look.

How the JavaScript Client was Built #

Our javascript client is built in typescript 1.5 and is transpiled to es5. We have a single client that works with both Node.js and JavaScript due to dependency injection and a Universal Module Definition (UMD). For capturing Node stack traces, we use Felixge's Node Stack Trace library.

Installing Exceptionless for Node.js #

  1. Install the package by running npm install exceptionless --save-dev
  2. Add the Exceptionless client to your app:
var client = require('exceptionless.node').ExceptionlessClient.default;

Configuring the Client #

You can configure the Exceptionless client a few different ways for Node.js. The below is the most common way, but for more configuration options and documentation, visit the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub repo. NOTE: The only required setting you need to configure is the client's apiKey.

Set the apiKey on the default ExceptionlessClient instance.

var client = require('exceptionless.node').ExceptionlessClient.default;
client.config.apiKey = 'API_KEY_HERE';

Sending Events #

Once configured, the Exceptionless Node.js JavaScript client will automatically send your dashboard any unhandled exceptions that happen in your application. If you would like to send additional event types, such as log messages, feature usages, etc, take a look at the below examples.

Make sure to check out the Exceptionless.JavaScript GitHub Repo for the latest examples and documentation.

Sending Log Messages, Feature Usages, etc #

var client = require('exceptionless.node').ExceptionlessClient.default;

client.submitLog('Logging made easy');

// You can also specify the log source and log level.
// We recommend specifying one of the following log levels: Trace, Debug, Info, Warn, Error
client.submitLog('app.logger', 'This is so easy', 'Info');
client.createLog('app.logger', 'This is so easy', 'Info').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit feature usages
client.submitFeatureUsage('MyFeature');
client.createFeatureUsage('MyFeature').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit a 404
client.submitNotFound('/somepage');
client.createNotFound('/somepage').addTags('Exceptionless').submit();

// Submit a custom event type
client.submitEvent({ message = 'Low Fuel', type = 'racecar', source = 'Fuel System' });

Manually Sending Errors #

In addition to automatically sending all unhandled exceptions, you can also manually send events to Exceptionless using our fluent event builder API.

The below example demonstrates sending a new error, "test," and setting the ReferenceID, Order and Quote properties, Tags, Geo, UserIdentity, and marking it as Critical.

var client = require('exceptionless.node').ExceptionlessClient.default;

try {
throw new Error('test');
} catch (error) {
client.createException(error)
// Set the reference id of the event so we can search for it later (reference:id).
// This will automatically be populated if you call client.config.useReferenceIds();
.setReferenceId('random guid')
// Add the order object (the ability to exclude specific fields will be coming in a future version).
.setProperty("Order", order)
// Set the quote number.
.setProperty("Quote", 123)
// Add an order tag.
.addTags("Order")
// Mark critical.
.markAsCritical()
// Set the coordinates of the end user.
.setGeo(43.595089, -88.444602)
// Set the user id that is in our system and provide a friendly name.
.setUserIdentity(user.Id, user.FullName)
// Submit the event.
.submit();
}

Express.js Support #

If you are using Express.js to develop a web application, you can add Exceptionless and start collecting unhandled errors and 404s very quickly. To start, just add the following middleware to the bottom of your middleware definitions.

// This middleware processes any unhandled errors that may occur in your middleware.
app.use(function(err, req, res, next) {
client.createUnhandledException(err, 'express').addRequestInfo(req).submit();
res.status(500).send('Something broke!');
});

// This middleware processes 404’s.
app.use(function(req, res, next) {
client.createNotFound(req.originalUrl).addRequestInfo(req).submit();
res.status(404).send('Sorry cant find that!');
});

What Data is Collected? #

The JavaScript/Node.js client is full featured, will collect all the information our other clients collect, and has a fluent API as shown above.

By default, we wire up to the processes' uncaught exception handler to automatically send any unhandled exceptions to your Exceptionless dashboard. We also submit a log message if your app doesn't shut down properly via inspecting the exit code, which is very useful and lets you know what your app is doing. Additionally, any queued up events are processed and sent before your app closes.

Each event contains environment and request information, as well, rounding out the complete list of Exceptionless features that we have made available via the JavaScript client, making it a great error and event reporting/logging solution for all your Node.js projects.

Exceptionless Node.js Event Environment Details

Environment Details

Sample Express.js App

We have built a quick Express.js sample app that you can play around with to get an idea of how the Node.js JavaScript client works with Exceptionless.

Run the sample app by following the steps below:

  1. Install Node.js
  2. Clone or download our repository from GitHub.
  3. Navigate to the example\express folder via the command line (e.g., cd example\express)
  4. Run npm install
  5. Open app.js in your favorite text editor and set the apiKey..
  6. Run node app.js.
  7. Navigate to http://localhost:3000 in your browser to view the express app.
  8. To create an error, navigate to http://localhost:3000/boom

Troubleshooting #

We recommend enabling debug logging by calling client.config.useDebugLogger();. This will output messages to the console regarding what the client is doing. Please contact us by creating an issue on GitHub if you need assistance or have any feedback for the project.

Feedback #

As we move forward towards version 1.0 of our JavaScript client, we are looking for any and all feedback, so please don't hesitate to let us know what you think, report a bug, etc.

Thanks!

JavaScript Client Available for Preview & Testing!

Exceptionless JavaScript Client

That's right ladies and gentlemen, we've been working on a JavaScript client, and it's ready to peak it's head out into the wild.

We're talking beta status here, but version 1.0 is on its way and we wanted to let you guys play with it as soon as possible to provide feedback and help us work out the bugs, etc, quicker.

It's tough to contain our excitement about getting this out there, and we hope you'll check it out!

Exceptionless JavaScript Client Overview #

The client supports Node.js and JavaScript, and you can find up-to-date installation, configuration, and usage documentation over on the GitHub repo.

Just like the non-JavaScript client, unhandled exceptions will be automatically sent upon configuration, and you can send log messages, feature usage events, etc. All the normal Exceptionless functionality is available.

Wanted! #

Testers, developers, contributors, and feedback wanted! We want to make the Exceptionless JavaScript client awesome, but we need your help. Give us any feedback you might have via GitHub an in-app message, contact form submission, or comment right here on this blog post. We're more than happy to answer any and all questions, or help you get up and running.

Exceptionless V2.0.1 Shipped!

This release focused on bug fixes since the 2.0 release and include the below notable changes.

Exceptionless Server #

  • API Status page now also checks the status of Storage, Queues and Message Bus.
  • Added the ability to requeue events (E.X., archived or events that failed to process).
  • Added the ability to send out system and release notifications.
  • Made the event posting and processing async. This has huge performance gains under load.
  • The GeoIP Database is now stored in the storage folder. This made it easier to update it via a job as well as removed some extra configuration settings.
  • Made some minor changes that make it a bit easier to self host (more to come 2.1).

Please take a look at the Exceptionless changelog for a full list of the changes.

Exceptionless.UI #

  • Added a busy indicators to some buttons allowing you to see the state of an action (E.G., Marking a stack as fixed).
  • Added the ability to refresh the app if there is a critical website bug.
  • Fixed a bug where some stack traces couldn't be displayed.
  • Made some minor changes that make it a bit easier to self host (more to come 2.1).

Please take a look at the Exceptionless.UI changelog for a full list of the changes.

Let us know if you have any questions! #